Author Archives: admin

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Kethcikan Museums welcome new director

Category : Alaska

She has lived in a variety of places such as Aalborg, Denmark; Tlaxiaco, Mexico; most recently Lafayette, Louisiana, and once she stayed at a 11th century castle in Alnwick, England. Lee Gray of Minnesota will take the reins. and Saturday, Jan. There will be community forums at the Ketchikan Public Library for discussions on the renovations (an anticipated opening for the new exhibits slated for May 2018) on Wednesday, Jan. 25 from 6:30-8 p.m. 28 from 2-3:30 p.m. Her background is based in the visual arts as well as an educator and curator. She attained a doctorate in American Cultural Studies from Ohio University with a certificate in Women’s Studies. Ketchikan Museums welcome new director
KETCHIKAN — Even more change comes for the Ketchikan Museums along with their renovations – a new museum director.


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Writers’ Weir: The Family at Eagle Rock

Category : Alaska

But my stiff old fingers moved slowly, and barely one photo I’d bagged,
when another one flew past our window, adding wonder to my shock. His white-headed parent passed over, and rose to perch on a snag. To submit to Writers’ Weir, email editor Mary Catharine Martin at editor@capweek.com. Robert Winfree celebrates the wonders of life and imagination through science, photography, art and writing. He is currently focused on creating and sharing memories about Alaska’s public lands as an artist-in-residence for Alaska’s state and national parks. I saw them in the weeks that followed, at least daily they came to our tree. Thus was my first introduction to the family at Eagle Rock. We grew to love this family of eagles, two bald and one brown, did we. I grabbed right away for my camera, and fiddled with knobs I could reach. The first was a mottled brown youngster and that one flew straight at me,
then banked at the front porch window, and dove for a branch in the tree. THE FAMILY AT EAGLE ROCK
BY ROBERT WINFREE

Sipping my morning coffee and wiping my bleary eyes,
I looked out the bay view window, when to my great surprise,
two eagles came into my view, flying up and away from the beach. Fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction accepted as space and competition allow.


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The House that Gruening Built

Category : Alaska

I imagine Ernest holding a pen, while Dorothy sketches the view,
of mountains and sea through bay windows, the same glass that now I gaze through. THE HOUSE THAT GRUENING BUILT

BY ROBERT WINFREE

The plaque on the wall had told us, that a statesman built this fine place. In mind’s eye I’m seeing his face. On the mantle lay books about Gruening. Our story is now laid before you, and the artworks hang on a wall,
We give thanks to our hosts in Alaska, who preserve parks to benefit of all. State Park staff friendly and gracious, we now fondly recall,
for they brought us fuel for our fire, drinking water, and all. Here the Governor drafted papers, powerful words of mystery,
for they made Alaska into a state, and for us – that’s now history. Our chariot brought us home again safely, though damaged and a broken window,
From an accidental meeting in Skagway, and a tumbling rock near Juneau. We’d threaded byways through Alaska – and then through Canada twice,
Reading poems by Service on mountains, and past rivers of glacier ice. Sketching on canvas in charcoal, and splashing colors acrylic and oil,
I paint to preserve the sunsets that darkness of night will spoil. Animals in abundance, everywhere we could see,
There were eagles alighting on branches, and a bear playing behind the next tree. Three weeks we spent in that cabin,
another coming, and one back home again. Tall conifers above well-groomed paths, where red squirrels gathered their cones,
seals frolicking in waves below us, where seabirds picked among stones. The Gruening’s cabin is now used by artists, and with its lands become a State Park,
where artists can stay in the evening, while outdoors it’s cold, wet, and dark.


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Local documentary maker turns camera to a romantic comedy

Category : Alaska

The next phase, post-production, has been longer. He just asked people he knew to take part. Also, to pay the actors, rent the equipment and other expenses amounted to $7,000. Crowder, who has done plays with Perseverance Theatre, only had a short space of time to learn all of Hedges’ former lines, which he did wonderfully, Chaney said. For an interview with Crowder by Chaney, go to: vimeo.com/199282581. “I wanted to do something interesting, and I wanted to see what the local community could do,” Chaney said. From writing the script to organizing and then filming took about three months. “I really needed [Fukazaka] and the lead actor to at least have a good working relationship. Jeff Hedges, a Juneau man who is member of the Screen Actors Guild, was slated for the leading man. “If we were going to do this, we wanted to do this ‘right.’ We weren’t going to try and dodge any rules and that becomes very complicated very quickly.”
Because of all the prep work before filming, when Hedges got into a serious motorcycle accident four days before filming, it nearly “iced” the film. LOCAL DOCUMENTARY MAKER TURNS CAMERA, PEN TO ROMANTIC COMEDY

BY CLARA MILLER
Capital City Weekly
Greg Chaney, a Juneau filmmaker, is used to telling the stories of others through his documentaries. Chaney said the showing is free but donations are requested to help cover the cost of renting the theatre. But most of the editing is done and he already has a viewing draft complete. “Bryan Crowder, he took up this huge challenge at the last minute,” Chaney said. The movie will premiere at the Gold Town Nickelodeon Theatre on Feb. The first casting problem came when he couldn’t find anyone to play the part of the villain, Kokona’s boyfriend, Brian. “For writers, it’s write what you know. But it was better than that,” Chaney said, mentioning how they would prefer to practice their lines together. Chaney used three cameras simultaneously for the shots (occasionally even a drone for distance shots), so if he just wanted more angles to choose from, he’d have them. After meeting on the downtown docks, the two grow close as they learn more about each other in an effort to dupe Kokona’s boyfriend into believing they are secretly dating, and John introduces Kokona to the Alaska way of life. Chaney wrote “1 ½ Days” during late spring/early summer of 2016, and then gave it to others in the film community to read and share their thoughts. “They got along great.”
The filming happened over four days in late July. It’s a real testament to the community and the creative power … and the group of people we have.”
To see a trailer for the movie, go to: vimeo.com/199279557. Kiyomi Fukazawa, whom Chaney met at a screening for “The Empty Chair” and who is also a SAG member, was cast as the leading lady; she is the only non-Juneau resident to be part of the film. “It’s not the best script ever,” he admitted, stating it does follow the basic formula of romantic comedies. There were permits to get to film at certain locations, rentals of high-end digital cameras, and coordinating availability between cast and crew (which amounted between 15-20 people). “I just wanted to make a compelling story that holds together that we could film in Juneau.”
“1 ½ Days” tells the story of Kokona, a Japanese tourist who is trying to escape an abusive relationship, and John, a Juneau man who is trying to find the courage to follow his dreams. For independent filmmakers, I’d say write what you own,” Chaney said. He’s made “Journey on the Wild Coast,” which is about a couple traveling under their own power from Seattle to the Aleutian Islands, and the “The Empty Chair,” which tells the tale of Juneau’s Japanese-American citizens who were interned during World War II, along with the city’s response. He wrote the script around locations he knew he could use, like his cabin and boat, or easy to use places with a permit like Perseverance Trail. He even cast Bruce Laughlin, a local pilot with a bush plane, as himself. Then we would have at least three cameras filming. “Oddly enough, we created a character so unlikable that nobody wants to be that person. “I wanted to film it sort of like a play. He even did all his own stunts. The actors would know their lines for the whole of the script before we started. Chaney had to find a replacement and fast. • Contact reporter Clara Miller at clara.miller@morris.com. By the time the shooting period was over, everyone was “toasted,” he said, himself in particular. But his latest film, “1 ½ Days,” is no documentary at all ­— it’s a romantic comedy with a Southeast Alaskan twist. for the cast and crew (the public is invited too). “I’d give people the script and they’d read it and go ‘No, I don’t want to be that guy.’ I was like, oh, this is really hard — everyone wants to be the good guy,” Chaney said. They would have three people walking backwards filming, and then you’d have somebody guiding them and we’d have a sound person … so we had four different microphones and three cameras following the action,” Chaney explained. But Connor Lendrum, who worked at Kindred Post at that time … he was willing to do it.”
Getting the film up and running took a lot of doing. Chaney didn’t hold auditions for the movie. “The only way we made [“1 ½ Days”] possible was because people in Juneau volunteered their help and their equipment and props. “Filming is exhausting and intense and delightful, and editing is more like … very solitary.”
The joke is that many independent films die in post-production, Chaney said, explaining the editor has to keep going through old footage and fixing various problems. “There is lots of time spent in the editing room,” Chanaey said, and with a full time job as the lands and resources manager of the City and Borough of Juneau, he can’t spend all day editing. 1 at 7 p.m.


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AWARE celebrates 40th birthday with concert

Category : Alaska

She calls AWARE “an excellent community partner that provides vital services regarding domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse.”
The event’s other sponsors include the Alaskan Brewery, B’s Bakery, Chef Stef, Coppa, EVENT! They are available online, at the JAHC, Hearthside Books and at the door. Tickets ($40 admits two) include music, sweets and a no-host bar. AWARE celebrates 40 years of service with a dance party/fundraiser
To celebrate 40 years of providing services to Juneau and the Northern Panhandle, AWARE (Aiding Women in Abuse and Rape Emergencies) will host a birthday party at 8 p.m. Alaska, Marms and Meeks and the Rockwell Ballroom. 28. The event’s main sponsor is local pediatrician Joy Neyhart, owner of Rainfores Pediatric Care. in the Rockwell Ballroom on Jan. Susu and the Prophets, a local popular band, will rock the house while some of Juneau’s gourmet bakers and ice cream makers (B’s Bakery, Chef Stef and Coppa) serve up birthday treats.


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Con Brio Chamber Series presents “Low Brass Music and Other Noises”

Category : Alaska

The final concert in the four-program series will be Rites of Spring – featuring French music for harp, flute, strings and piano on April 14 and 15 to benefit Juneau Alaska Music Matters (JAMM). Giorgio, Truitt and Ayer are the bulwark of Juneau Symphony’s low brass section, while trombonist Roger Schmidt hails from Sitka where he serves as the executive director of the Sitka Fine Arts Camp. For more information on Con Brio, contact Sally Schlichting at 907-957-3488 or sally.schlichting@gmail.com. 20 at 8 p.m. This program has solo works for trombone and tuba by Mozart, Mascagni, Grøndahl, Saint-Saëns and Croatian composer Stjepan Šulek and quartets by Bach, Bruckner, and John Williams, peppered throughout with surprises and familiar hits, from Daft Punk to Dr. Performances are Friday, Jan. The Con Brio Chamber Series provides musicians an opportunity to create, perform and share their love of chamber music as well as support a favorite cause. Written by Fairbanks composer, Emerson Eads and Juneau playwright, Dave Hunsaker, the work will premiere in Juneau in October 2018. Con Brio Chamber Series presents “Low Brass Music and Other Noises”
JUNEAU — The Con Brio Chamber Series presents: “Low Brass Music and Other Noises,” low brass music performed by Katy Giorgio, Roger Schmidt, and Ken Truitt on trombones, and Tim Ayer on tuba, joined by Douglas Smith on piano. Admission is free with donations going to the commission of an Alaskan opera commemorating the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Princess Sophia. at Aldersgate United Methodist Church in the Mendenhall Valley, and Saturday, Jan. at the State Library Archives and Museum (SLAM) atrium, Juneau’s newest acoustical space. Strangelove. Seating at the SLAM is limited, so arrive early. 21 at 2 p.m. Right: Art for the Con Brio concert


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Ben Huff to give final Alaska Positive lecture

Category : Alaska

21. This free event will be held at the Father Andrew P. Huff to lecture
Alaska Positive, the Alaska State Museum’s biennial photo exhibit, will soon come to close on Jan. The final lecturer will be local photographer and founder of the independent publisher Ice Fog Press, Ben Huff. Kashevaroff building at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 19.


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‘Piano Tide’ offers a story of environmental ethics in Southeast Alaska

Category : Alaska

“The characters just walked into my life laughing, so what can you do then?”

• Contact Capital City Weekly managing editor Mary Catharine Martin at maryc.martin@capweek.com. Axel, for instance, represented the anthropocentric point of view, she said. ‘PIANO TIDE’ AND ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
BY MARY CATHARINE MARTIN
CAPITAL CITY WEEKLY
A woman with a piano, a dog, and not much else ferries into a tiny Southeast Alaskan village. She’ll be reading in Juneau at Hearthside Bookstore in the Nugget Mall at 6 p.m.. That’s the premise of “Piano Tide,” environmental ethicist and writer Kathleen Dean Moore’s first book of fiction. There’s a beautiful passage in which Moore draws parallels between the tuning of a piano and the environment. “It’s not that we can’t fish, but we can’t fish out the breeds. “And it seemed to me I really needed to know what that meant. I spent years and years making these people into people the readers would care about, until I couldn’t write about them without laughing and crying.”
Moore said the point she considers most important is that “there has to be a better way.”
“It’s not that we can’t cut trees, but we can do that honorably,” she said. How do people do that? She first came to Southeast Alaska as a writer in residence at the Island Institute in Sitka in 2006. Later she’ll be reading in Anchorage, sponsored by 49 Writers. Moore is now working on the sequel to “Piano Tide.”
“I didn’t think I would,” she said. Initially, each of her characters represented a different theory of environmental ethics. “For a long time I’ve been writing books and speeches and harangues about stopping climate change and extinctions, and it’s all been very abstract, and I’ve been saying really abstract things like ‘stand strong against the corporate plunder of the planet,’” Moore said. What does it cost them? The townspeople — a grumpy, shouting philosopher in a wheelchair; a burly, jobless, fix-it-all man; a teenage would-be bear guide with a secret girlfriend — watch the woman arrive and help her haul her piano onto the porch of her cabin. Juneau musician Linda Buckley will perform with her. Much of Moore’s knowledge about music is due to her friend Rachelle McCabe, a concert pianist, Moore said. “I wanted all my characters to be complex that always, they were trying to do the right thing…. The two have been touring together on a program about extinction. Then Axel, a local businessman, decides to dam a salmon stream and cage a wild bear for a tourist attraction, and the woman with the piano, and her new friends, have to decide what they’ll do about it. “She has taught me so much about music,” Moore said. We need to find a way towards a sustainable, honorable harvest, which is entirely possible if we start questioning our presupposition about who deserves what.”
Home is a central theme in the narrative, as is the consequence of taking action, and music itself. How do they make the plans? “It’s been thrilling for me… I see things differently.”
The art on the cover is by Juneau painter Dick Zagars. What regrets will they have?”
Moore, until recently a professor of environmental ethics at Oregon State University, spends her summers on Chichagof Island in Southeast Alaska (her author bio says she “writes from a small cabin where two creeks and a bear trail meet a tidal cove”). Also, “Because there’s so much music in the book, I’ve been trying to bring a musician to the stage” when she reads, Moore said. Other reading locations haven’t yet been decided. Some of Moore’s books are “Riverwalking: Reflections on Moving Water,” “Holdfast: At Home in the Natural World;: “The Pine Island Paradox,” “Wild Comfort,” and “Great Tide Rising.” She’s won the Pacific Northwest Book Award, Sigurd Olson Nature Writing Award and Oregon Book Award for Creative Nonfiction. She worked on “Piano Tide” for 8-10 years, she estimates. (An anthropocentric view is one that “regards humankind as the central or most important element of existence, especially as opposed to God or animals,” according to an online definition.)
But “as soon as I started to get these characters fleshed out, they refused to be pigeonholed,” Moore said.


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The Canvas annual fundraiser

Category : Alaska

Canvas fundraiser
The Canvas at REACH’s annual fundraising dinner is Feb. Handcrafted plates by ceramics studio manager Alex Botelho will be attendees’ to keep. 4. at The Canvas and costs $60 a plate. There will be live music, a silent auction, and a dinner prepared by Sandpiper Café chef Joe Manning. The menu will be Moroccan-inspired. The dinner is at 6 p.m.


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‘Piano Tide’ excerpt: August 24

Category : Alaska

Long antennae reach toward the dying and the dead. A hermit crab reaches tentatively for torn flesh. When the banquet is finished, there is no flesh, only skeletons and strips of white skin, swaying. He vomits salmon tails and trailing intestines that sink through the currents. It’s the flood tide of the dog-salmon moon, the highest tide of the month. Skeletons with silver skirts ride the ghost net, hissing. EXCERPT
Just before midnight, a bulge of sea rolls smoothly past Good River Harbor. The ghost net floats past the town on great tidal currents, gathering bones. The net snags her gill plates. More salmon nudge into the net, flashing silver as they struggle to escape. Spot-shrimp stalk in on spidery legs, following their orange prows. Salmon and salmon and salmon nose into the net that seizes them more tightly the more they flail. Her head slides through the mesh, but her body is too wide to pass. But then he veers and noses into the net. Dungeness crab move in, scuttling sideways. Hear the tick of small teeth, the click of small claws. Tasting blood, a salmon shark sways close to the net, singing his rough flank against the fibers. Silver tails swirl. He snatches off a thrashing tail, snatches another. Listen now. She backs away. Heavy now with the dead, the net slowly sinks until it settles, swaying on the floor of the sea. A dog salmon nudges into the net. Without the heavy flesh, the net rises again on its floats. On its dark currents, it carries a lost gill net, drifting unmoored. Strips of skin swirl. Plated heads grin. The fibers dig into the feathery red tissue, deeper as the salmon tugs to get away. A school of salmon weaves through the kelp forest, approaching the net, wary in the night. The water is cloudy with sea-fleas and shrimp eating the soft meat under the silver skin, nibbling around the bones, a cloud of eating. A gray cod snaps up the falling pieces and pushes into the net, where she finds her own death. The shark whips his head from side to side, savaging the net, driving the falling scales into silver swirls. A small sculpin thrusts its spiked head into the red tissues and spins, tearing off flesh. The nets bulge and recoil. Bubbles pop from shrimps’ mouths and stream toward the moon. She curls her body and snaps it straight, yanking at the net until her blood pinkens the sea. These are the dangerous nets, detached from human intention. He catches first a tooth, then pushing forward, catches another. There she hangs by her head, caught by gill plates bright and round as the moon, cratered with the moon’s shadowed seas.


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Rasmuson has new board member, two new staff

Category : Alaska

She recently led the Marketing and Communications Department at the University of Alaska Anchorage-Matanuska-Susitna College campus. She also serves as an adjunct professor in the business department at the university. Lifelong Alaskan Kris Palmatier joined the Foundation staff as accounting manager in 2016. Smith has more than 20 years of experience as a senior corporate management professional. After graduating from West Anchorage High School, he co-founded a local dance studio. Palmatier currently serves as a board member and officer for Alaska Junior Theater. A strong advocate for the Mat-Su Valley Community, Courtney has served as V.P. Henderson spent the first decade of her professional life working with at-risk children and families. Henderson brings her experience as a lifelong Alaskan, small business owner and advocate for children to the Rasmuson Board. She has held senior positions specializing in the small business market with Fortune 50 firms, including JPMorgan Chase, American Express and Goldman Sachs. Rasmuson has new board, staff members

Rasmuson Foundation has elected a new member to its Board of Directors and has added two new employees to its team: Rebecca Brice Henderson, Kris Palmatier and Courtney Brooke Smith. Smith was hired as the foundation’s communications manager in 2016. for the Greater Wasilla Chamber of Commerce and President of the Colony High School Music Booster Club. She served as a board member for the Resource Center for Parents and Children and Fairbanks Counseling & Adoption. She is the owner of Santa’s Vagabond Travel, and keeps up with the changing issues that affect the travel industry through her service as President of the Pacific Northwest Board of the American Society of Travel Agents. Palmatier went on to work in a variety of financial functions with the State of Alaska, Cornerstone Construction Company, and Kimura and Associates. He started Underground Dance Company with his talent and passion for dance, and discovered that he also had an interest in and aptitude for the business side of the operation.


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Haines duo to exhibit encaustic art

Category : Alaska

“We work on them for a while and then we switch, and I might work on that one for a while and then I’ll work on his for awhile, and then we switch again,” she said. Haines duo to exhibit beach-themed encaustic art
Haines­—Sam Jackson and Rebecca Brewer stumbled onto their new medium by accident. Seward. AAC continues to accept proposals for both rotating and semi-permanent window, wall and floor art installations in Art on Main Street storefront gallery. Whatever the medium, though, the colors are always bright. “And as we were walking, Sam stopped in his tracks and looked at me and said, ‘I gotta do that.’”
The two have been creating their own encaustic pieces since October, and will debut their work on Feb. at the Alaska Arts Confluence’s Art on Main Street Gallery, 217 Main Street, Gateway Building in Haines. “What comes out of his brain mixes with what comes out of my brain. The request for proposal application is available to download at http://www.alaskaartsconfluence.org. And then at some point either he or I will say, ‘Is it done?’ It’s a very playful process.”
Jackson trends toward maritime subjects in the less abstract pieces: boats, water, and birds can often be spotted in both his encaustic work and the acrylic paintings he is known for around Haines. Encaustics is the use of hot wax in art. The pair usually collaborates on more than one piece at a time, Brewer said. “It’s very colorful, very happy,” Brewer said. The exhibit opening will run from 5 to 7 p.m. The two apply pigmented wax to the cedar with paintbrushes, layering the colors before they heat and carve patterns into the malleable material. “We watched her for a while and then we walked away,” Brewer said. 3 as part of Haines’ First Friday event. Walking along the Yukon River during July’s “Art on the Waterfront” festival in Whitehorse, the duo ran across Nicole Bergman conducting an encaustics demonstration in one of the many artist tents. “It will be good for February.”
Haines began celebrating First Friday in February 2015, with local businesses and organizations holding arts and cultural events on the first Friday of each month, creating an Art Walk in downtown Haines that now extends from Jones Point to Historic Fort William H. Brewer and Jackson are largely inspired by the beach, taking long walks during low tide to collect shells, rocks, and driftwood to affix to the cedar veneers they use for the base of their encaustics.


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PeaceHealth Medical Group to have ear, nose and throat specialist

Category : Alaska

Ketchikan to have new visiting ear, nose, throat specialist
Ketchikan — Nathan Christensen, M.D., has joined PeaceHealth Medical Group in Ketchikan as a visiting ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist. Christensen first joined PeaceHealth in 2013 after serving for four years in the United States Air Force. His training also prepares him to help with facial traumas and deformities, speech problems involving the larynx, salivary gland conditions, surgical treatment of snoring and pediatric ENT conditions. 23. He is an experienced otolaryngologist who works fulltime for PeaceHealth at a clinic in Eugene, Oregon, and will visit Ketchikan regularly to provide specialized care for patients with issues such as hearing loss, chronic sinusitis and tumors. Christensen begins seeing patients in Ketchikan on Jan. Christensen will provide patients in southern Southeast Alaska with a full spectrum of ear, nose and throat procedures including minimally invasive treatments of sinus disease as well as throat and neck cancer, right in Ketchikan. Christensen attended medical school at Oregon Health & Science University and then went on to the University of Rochester where he completed his internship in general surgery and his residency in otolaryngology. Christensen has a special interest in caring for people with thyroid and parathyroid disorders.


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Juneau to have 6th annual Project Homeless Connect

Category : Alaska

The event will happen on Wednesday, Jan. 25, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. These services include: food, birth certificates and IDs, transportation, legal services, haircuts, veteran support, PFD and voter registration, housing assistance and wellness services and more. For more information or to volunteer, contact Shari or Tamara at 780-4475 or 780-4500. Juneau to have 6th annual Project Homeless Connect
Every year, the Juneau Coalition on Housing & Homelessness puts on Project Homeless Connect, a free event that serves as a one-day, one-stop for Juneau’s homeless to get access to a variety of services and resources.


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Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center Fireside Lecture Series

Category : Alaska

Jans will autograph photos of the wolf and his books prior to and after the first lecture. Doors open for this special event at 5:30 p.m. and repeat at 8 p.m. The free lectures begin at 6:30 p.m. Call (907) 789-0097 for information. Jans’ presentations will include a narrated slide show featuring the wolf, and short readings from Nick’s book, “A Wolf Called Romeo.”
“The completion of this exhibit has been a long time coming,” says Jans. We did all we could to make this exhibit the best it could be; and it will be a lasting part of Juneau’s history.”
Fireside Lectures are free. on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at no charge. The Juneau community and others contributed more than $40,000 to construct the new exhibit, a museum quality diorama designed by EDX of Seattle and built by wildlife artist Brian Kadrmas that will feature the wolf reclining on a rock outcropping, two interpretive panels, a bronze cast of the wolf’s paw-print, and his recorded howls. to 4 p.m. There is no elevator access due to construction and elevator replacement this winter. The exhibit dedication will be during the intermission between repeat lectures by Alaskan writer and photographer Nick Jans. Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center is open in winter from 10 a.m. 13, in conjunction with the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center Fireside Lecture Series, the US Forest Service will hold a ribbon-cutting ceremony for a new exhibit featuring a black wolf. Guests need to use the outdoor ramp or stairs. “Hard to believe it’s been more than seven years, but the important thing is that we’re here. On Friday, Jan.


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Artists invited to apply for Rasmuson Foundation grants

Category : Alaska

Distinguished Artist candidates are identified through a nomination process. Project Awards are available in 11 artistic disciplines: choreography, crafts, folk and traditional arts, literary arts/scriptworks, media arts, multidiscipline, music composition, new genre, performance art, presentation/interpretation and visual arts. Alaska artists at all stages of their careers can apply for grants in 11 disciplines. The Distinguished Artist is a single, unrestricted grant of $40,000 given to an individual with a history of creative excellence and accomplishment in Alaska. For 2017, Fellowships will be awarded in choreography, crafts, folk and traditional arts, literary arts/scriptworks and performance art. on Jan. Twenty-five Project Awards and 10 Fellowships are awarded annually. Artists must submit an application to be considered for these awards. Fellowships rotate annually. 24 at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center. Artists are encouraged to apply online via rasmuson.org/IAA. There will be a workshop to provide an overview of the grant options and to answer application related questions. Project Awards and Fellowships are grants of $7,500 and $18,000, respectively, that can be used to purchase needed equipment, explore techniques and undertake activities that aid in the artists’ development. Artists invited to apply for Rasmuson Foundation grants
The Rasmuson Foundation is accepting applications for the 2017 Individual Artist Awards program. Applicants must be at least 18 years old, have lived in Alaska more than two years and not received an Individual Artist Award in 2015 or 2016. The one in Juneau will be from noon-1 p.m. The Individual Artist Awards consists of three opportunities: Project Awards, Fellowships and the Distinguished Artist award. The deadline is March 1. Launched in 2004, the Individual Artist Awards program has supported 408 artists in 52 communities across Alaska. Call (877) 366-2700 (toll free in Alaska) for more information.


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AWARE recruiting volunteers for youth empowerment programs

Category : Alaska

20 to learn more and register for the trainings at nataliew@awareak.org or 586-4902. The mandatory new coach training for Girls on the Run is scheduled for Jan. Coaches need not be runners; men and women of all ages, shapes, sizes and backgrounds are invited to participate. 28, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. AWARE recruiting volunteers for youth empowerment programs
With a new season soon approaching for Aiding Women in Abuse and Rape Emergencies’ (AWARE) youth empowerment programs, Boys Run I toowú klatseen and Girls on the Run, AWARE are seeking coaches. Contact Natalie at AWARE, Inc. Coach applications are due by Jan. Coaches work in small groups to deliver the program curriculum, listen, encourage and help prepare their team to walk or run a 5k. Coaches must be positive role models who live healthy lifestyles and believe in ending violence in their community through positive youth development and mentorship. 4 from 9 a.m-5 p.m. All new coaches must attend a full-day training and commit to volunteering one to two afternoons per week after school for 90 minutes throughout the season. by Jan. The Boys Run I toowú klatseen mandatory new coach training is Feb. 20.


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Craig Public Library awarded $1,000 NOAA PLACE Grant

Category : Alaska

Craig Public Library awarded $1,000 NOAA PLACE Grant
CRAIG — The Craig Public Library has been awarded a $1,000 grant as part of the Public Libraries Advancing Community Engagement (PLACE) program funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Community members will read popular fiction and non-fiction books and watch human-interest videos about people who have developed resilient strategies for facing climate challenges. Librarians will receive professional development and, in partnership with NOAA scientists, co-facilitate a three-part public library program series for their community. PLACE engages people to discuss local weather challenges and threats. Participants will become aware of online tools that can provide information for their own community, family and individual planning for extreme weather and other climate events. NOAA said librarians can play a significant role in increasing a community’s ability to recover quickly from, plan for and anticipate weather impacts.


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Writers’ Weir: Days after the Winter Solstice

Category : Alaska

Days after the Winter Solstice

BY RICHARD STOKES

Even if you listen carefully

you will not hear the shift of breathing

in buds tightly clenched against winter. Deep in alder and cottonwood thickets

a buzz has started as more photons of light

cascade over the fist-tight buds

than yesterday and the day before,

beginning tingles of expectation and of hope,

a quickening to build day by day

until the green and aromatic explosion of Spring. • Richard Stokes, a Juneau resident since 1971, writes about nature, which he loves, and aging, which he is doing.


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SEAS shows sailing documentary

Category : Alaska

The showing will be at The Gold Town Nickelodeon at 6 p.m. The suggested $15 donation will go toward the club. Thursday, Jan. SEAS shows sailing documentary
SouthEast Alaska Sailing Club will host a special showing of “The Weekend Sailor,” a documentary about how “in 1973, against veteran superstars of sailing, an inexperienced Mexican captain raced in a 9-month deadly round-the-world regatta in an attempt to come home a champion.” A live question and answer session with the film’s director, Bernardo Arsuaga, will follow the film. For more information, go to www.seasailing.us. “The main challenge was not the human skill of their competitors, but the forces of nature on the open sea,” says the poster for the film. 26.